(301) 657-2500 Ext. 206 info@GilmerKitchens.com

Transitional Kitchen in Chevy Chase, Maryland

 
 
 
 

This kitchen design reaps the rewards of taking the road less traveled. The clients were unafraid of using unique materials, combined in dramatic ways, to create a space that is visually stunning and remarkably functional. We knew from the beginning that this kitchen would feature the innovative design and technology of Gaggenau appliances. The cooking area includes both gas and induction implements, seamlessly incorporated into the quartz countertop. 

To give the high-tech cooking area a European-provincial twist, the cooktop controls were set into a wide section of cabinetry with rolled steel panels by metal artist Cole Thompson. The hood area continues the look, with steel panels and a black walnut mantle. 

The result is a cooking alcove that looks like a built-in historical range, while it’s really a modern, high-tech solution with functional storage throughout.

The custom cabinetry for the kitchen features frameless construction for enhanced storage, built by Plato Woodwork. The finishes combine a crisp painted maple for the perimeter, and a rich stained cherry in the center island. 

The island features a unique shape, built to suit a kitchen that was (almost) too narrow for an island – and it tapers gracefully with curved shelving, a steel post, and a spectacular live-edge black walnut top by TreIncarnation, Inc. This piece, like the mantle, was built with reclaimed fallen wood that has been harvested locally and completely reborn. The backsplashes in the kitchen are as functional as they are beautiful. A porcelain tile laid into the cooking area is rustic and charming, and impervious to stains, oils, and other by-products of a kitchen that REALLY cooks. 

As a contrast, a subtle marble subway tile is the perfect accompaniment to the white cabinetry in the prep and cleaning area. The light fixtures add character, and are by West Elm. In a world where everybody seems to be pinning online projects, and wanting to re-create what’s already been done, this project is a perfect reminder that having the courage to be unique can really pay off.

Project Year: 2013
Country: United States
 
 
 

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